18 years of devotion, passion, and benevolence

18+years+of+devotion%2C+passion%2C+and+benevolence

Kwynne Schlossman, Lead Features Editor

Countless students and faculty members hold their “why Masters moment” which tends to consist of a simple smile or nod while they are greeted in the hall by their new community members. For Eileen Dieck who has been a cherished member of the Masters community for the past 18 years her why Masters moment, was through a simple gesture which is often taken for granted in the community, “at the end of a very long interview day, a student walked out of the door by Admissions before me, and they turned around and waited for me and held the door. And it’s such a simple thing, but it’s one of those things that we do here that people don’t do.”

I hope for Masters, I hope that we can become our best selves. I hope that culturally we continue to be kind to each other in an authentic way. I hope that as adults and as students we challenge each other, to be our best selves. And to not take this for granted. This is a really special place and we should treat it that way. ”

— Eileen Dieck

Ever since entering the work world, Dieck held a unique perspective than most, she searched for a meaning and lesson behind each job. She drew herself into each community, experienced and looked at the people as humans rather than coworkers. Dieck beautifully illustrated her work life experience and said, “When I was in high school. I was a grocery store clerk. I learned about people. I learned that elderly people sometimes go to the grocery store because they just want to see somebody and talk to somebody every day. When I got out of college, I worked in a management program with ATT. I managed people who did a job that I had no idea about, and yet I was their manager. So I learned to respect people’s experience and to build bridges. With people who are very different from me. You know, one of those people was a Vietnam veteran. And I used to have to call people in the middle of the night to get them to come into work. And his wife would have to wake him up with a pole because he would wake up afraid he was being attacked. So I just learned a lot about people. And then I went to med school and practiced medicine for a number of years. I learned a lot about life from taking care of people.”

Dieck’s entrance into the Masters community began in 2004. After battling family issues she found her love and joy in teaching. Dieck said,  “I teach because I think the world is broken, and working with kids is the best way to fix it. So even when I was teaching chemistry, which I did for 13 years here, it became about helping students think about who they are, about the choices that they make,  about being a mentor, being a coach.” 

And just as she wished, Dieck had one of the biggest influences on not only my only life but on all her students for the past 18 years. She taught me about resilience and what it truly means to be a good person in society, how to invest yourself in your greater community while doing real good. From Harkness discussions to captains meeting, Dieck has led the student body in bettering themselves for the greater good of Masters. 

One of her closets co workers, Meghan MacWilliams described Dieck’s presence on campus, “It has been a pleasure working with Dr. Dieck, she is one of the most dedicated people to not only what she does but even more to her students.”

Dieck has held a presence of joy and support across campus, students expressed they feel safe and nurtured by her in their times of need. 

A current student of Dieck, Maddie Marlowe said, “I learned this year how to be a better leader and friend. I was taught life lessons in a personal way and was able to understand the importance of kindness.” 

Dieck holds a lasting impact on students, especially through her Ethical Leadership class where students explore the concepts and depth behind leadership through building a close dynamic and trust in the classroom environment. Lauren Marlowe, ‘23,  another one of her current students, said, “ Every class we have the Starburst jar, though people in my class prefer Reeses. And every class she goes out of her way to make sure we have Reese’s`, it’s a small gesture but it’s things like that, which make Dr. Dieck who she is.” 

Senior Sander Peters also falls in the category of the multitudes of students who witnessed Dieck’s eminence. He said, ” Dr. Dieck has been one of the most incredible mentors at Masters I have had the privilege of knowing. She has touched each and everyone of her students with her welcoming spirit, positive attitude, tremendous wisdom and delicious baked goods. I have truly never met a teacher more dedicated to the success and well-being of their students.”

A graduate from the class of 2021 Franny Mann expressed Dieck’s life long influence on her life, “Dr. Dieck made me feel like a person rather than just a student. She taught me how to be a fearless leader, and opened my eyes to issues in need of fixing in the world.”

Dieck has watched students grow and has been a role model for all the past 18 years. Chris , a student from her first class serving as their dean in 2012 said, “ She supported us like a mother, she made sure everyone prepared themselves for the future.”

As Dieck leaves our community in a time of great change she leaves Masters with this, “I will miss students tremendously. But it’s time for me to move on to another stage of my life. What I hope for Masters, I hope that we can become our best selves. I hope that culturally we continue to be kind to each other in an authentic way. I hope that as adults and as students we challenge each other, to be our best selves. And to not take this for granted. This is a really special place and we should treat it that way.”

The Masters community would have truly been lost without Dieck, her legacy here will be treasured forever. She holds an eternal footprint on the community and her gift will be missed next year as she retires.